A temple of mysteries in Romania | Șinca Veche

50km from the city of Brașov, at the foot hills of Făgăraș Mountains, lies a cave so steeped in mystery and strange phenomena that it is rather difficult to describe. The Rupestral Monastery of Șinca Veche (or The Temple of Șinca Veche), also known as ‘The Temple of Fulfillment’, ‘The Temple of Wishes’, ‘The Temple of Fate’, ‘The Cave Monastery’ or just plain ‘Grotto’, is a national monument and, on this very spot, the Divine Liturgy was served for almost a quarter of a millennium. Why so many names? Well, because nobody really knows when the cave was actually sculpted and transformed into a place of worship, nor what the underground rooms were for.

Its age has been estimated at more than 7,000 years with even earlier Dacian origins. One of the arguments defending this is the presence of two altars, which can only mean that it is not of Christian origin. Historians say that, in this respect, it is utterly unique. Along with these, the cave also consists of 9 rooms with curious sculptures and shrines. Small, repetitive indentations in the wall give the feeling of a vast and indefinite space, whilst natural light comes in through the entrance and the ‘tower’ that opens upwards, connecting with the surface, allowing the sun to filter down onto the main altar below. Legend has it that this ‘tower’ serves as a pathway for supernatural energy to flow in and out. Dim though it is, there is enough light with the additional candles to contemplate a natural simplicity of indescribable beauty.

Since Șinca Veche is located at the border with what was once the Habsburg Empire, an amalgam of different religions and communities sheltered within these walls at various times, not least monks hiding from Austrian Empress Maria Teresa out to convert them to unthinkable Catholicism.

The walls are covered with drawings, many of which archaeologists have been unable to explain. Dating them is equally impossible. Amongst them, though, are more familiar signs and symbols including a Star of David above the second, least visible altar. Within it, a Yin and Yang, leading researchers to believe it dates from the pre-Dacian period.

“Strange energy” and “special place” are expressions used by those who have stepped inside to seek rest and solace here. On the eve of religious holidays, locals report that celestial choirs can be heard, whilst legend says the temple site is a gateway to other universes, where ancients communicated with the “upper world” or beings from parallel dimensions. There are stories of healing, dreams coming true after praying here and non-existent lights and shadows appearing on photographs. It is indeed a most mysterious place that sends your imagination running wild.

Source : sarahinromania.canalblog.com

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