The Mysteries of Coddu Vecchiu Tombs of Giants

During the Bronze Age (3300 – 700 BC), the Nuragic civilization built what are known as the Tombs of Giants (Tomba dei Gigantic). These megalithic gallery graves were used by the Nuragic people as public tombs, for the burials of many individuals from these early societies. Massive in size and astonishing to view, the giants’ grave at Coddu Vecchiu in Sardinia is one example that represents a somewhat mysterious and intriguing part of human history – providing some general answers as to the burial rituals of ancient human civilizations, but also leaving many questions unanswered.

The Nuragic civilization constructed two distinct types of tombs. The “slab type” was constructed from giant stone slabs which were placed upright, and buried into the ground. The slabs were placed side by side in a long row. They are uniform in height except for the center slab, known as a central stele, which is taller than the other slabs. Rising up to 4 meters (13 feet) in height, the central stele stands far above the other slabs, and has a doorway carved into its center. It is also generally decorated with carved text and images for funeral or memorial purposes, with the top carved into a rounded arch. In another variation, the center slab blended more easily with the surrounding slabs. It contained no alterations form its original state, other than the addition of a doorway. Through the doorway in the stele is a rectangular tomb and a burial chamber that is 5 – 15 meters (16 – 49 feet) long and 1 – 2 meters (3 – 7 feet) high. When the tombs were first constructed, they were covered by a large mound of dirt.

Source : ancient-origins.net

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