Queen of the Underworld Sheds New Light on Greek Tomb

The newly excavated Amphipolis tomb mosaic, seen here, depicts the figure of a woman identified as the goddess Persephone, queen of the underworld. The image might hold a clue to the contents of the tomb.

The newly excavated Amphipolis tomb mosaic, seen here, depicts the figure of a woman identified as the goddess Persephone, queen of the underworld. The image might hold a clue to the contents of the tomb.

Monumental in scale and Macedonian in style, the Amphipolis tomb (also known as the Kasta tumulus) lies close to the Aegean port that Alexander the Great used for his fleet. Archaeologists have dated the tomb to the last quarter of the fourth century B.C., likely placing its construction in the fractious period following Alexander’s death in 323 B.C. All this has fueled intense speculation that the tomb was built for someone close to Alexander, but clear evidence has been lacking.

The new find is raising hope that the tomb will add another chapter to the tumultuous history of the ancient Macedonian royal house. “Without doubt,” said archaeologist Katerina Peristeri, principal investigator of the Amphipolis tomb, “the deceased was extremely important.”

Source : news.nationalgeographic.com

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